Recently Created Quotes

Quotes recently added to the Goodreads catalog.

Kiese Laymon
“I knew, truth be told, that a present American man would likely teach me how to be a present American man. and I couldn't imagine how those teachings would have made me healthier or more generous.”
Kiese Laymon, Heavy: An American Memoir
“9ften”
Fanny Stenhouse, Tell it All A Woman's Life in Polygamy
Anthony Doerr
“But then, right at 2300 hours, Werner sees it, hardly one block from where they parked the Opel: an antenna sliding up alongside a chimney. Not much wider than a broomstick. It rises perhaps twelve meters and then unfolds as if by magic into a simple T. A high house on the edge of the sea. A spectacularly good location from which to broadcast. From street level, the antenna is all but invisible. He hears Jutta’s voice: I bet he does these broadcasts from a huge mansion, big as this whole colony, a place with a thousand rooms and a thousand servants. The house is tall and narrow, eleven windows in its facade. Splotched with orange lichen, its foundation furred with moss. Number 4 on the rue Vauborel. Open your eyes and see what you can with them before they close forever. He walks fast to the hotel, head down, hands in his pockets.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Phil Knight
“For some, I realize, business is the all-out pursuit of profits, period, full stop, but for us business was no more about making money than being human is about making blood. Yes, the human body needs blood. It needs to manufacture red and white cells and platelets and redistribute them evenly, smoothly, to all the right places, on time, or else. But that day-to-day business of the human body isn’t our mission as human beings. It’s a basic process that enables our higher aims, and life always strives to transcend the basic processes of living—and at some point in the late 1970s, I did, too. I redefined winning, expanded it beyond my original definition of not losing, of merely staying alive. That was no longer enough to sustain me, or my company. We wanted, as all great businesses do, to create, to contribute, and we dared to say so aloud. When you make something, when you improve something, when you deliver something, when you add some new thing or service to the lives of strangers, making them happier, or healthier, or safer, or better, and when you do it all crisply and efficiently, smartly, the way everything should be done but so seldom is—you’re participating more fully in the whole grand human drama. More than simply alive, you’re helping others to live more fully, and if that’s business, all right, call me a businessman.”
Phil Knight, Shoe Dog
Kiese Laymon
“After reading Bambara, I wondered for the first time how great an American sentence, paragraph, or book could be if it wasn't, at least partially, written to and for black Americans in the Deep South.”
Kiese Laymon, Heavy: An American Memoir
Anthony Doerr
“and Werner sees six-year-old Jutta lean toward him, Frau Elena kneading bread in the background, a crystal radio in his lap, the cords of his soul not yet severed.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Anthony Doerr
“and dream herself into the mind of the great marine biologist Aronnax, both guest of honor and prisoner on Captain Nemo’s great machine of curiosity, free of nations and politics, cruising through the kaleidoscopic wonders of the sea. Oh, to be free! To lie once more in the Jardin des Plantes with Papa. To feel his hands on hers, to hear the petals of the tulips tremble in the wind. He made her the glowing hot center of his life; he made her feel as if every step she took was important.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Albert Camus
“I force myself to write this diary, but my reluctance is exquisite. I know now why I never kept a personal diary: for me life is secretive. With respect to others (and that is what pained X. so much) but also, life must be lived through my own eyes, I must not reveal it in words. Unheard and unexposed, like this it is rich for me. If I force myself to keep a personal diary at this moment, it is out of panic in the face of my failing memory. But I am not sure I can continue. Besides, even so, I forget to note many things. And I say nothing of what I think.”
Albert Camus, Notebooks 1951-1959
Anthony Doerr
“Over Volkheimer’s shoulder, through the cracked rear window of the truck shell, Werner watches a red-haired child in a velvet cape float six feet above the road. She passes through trees and road signs, veers around curves; she is as inescapable as a moon.
Werner curls beneath the bench in the back and does not move for hours, bundled in a blanket, refusing tea, tinned meat, while the floating child pursues him through the countryside. Dead girl in the sky, dead girl out the window, dead girl three inches away. Two wet eyes and that third eye of the bullet hole never blinking.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Erasmus
“Por el contrario, será en verdad prudente, quien, sabiéndose mortal, no quiere conocer más que lo que le ofrece su condición, se presta gustoso a contemporizar con la muchedumbre humana y no tiene asco a andar errado junto a ella. Pero en esto, dirán, radica precisamente la Estulticia. No negaré que así sea, a condición de que se convenga en que tal es el modo de representar la comedia de la vida.”
Erasmus, Elogio de la Locura
“Here is a difference between the Warrior and the Hero. The man (or the boy) accessing the Hero, as we’ve said, does not know his limitations; he is romantic about his invulnerability. The warrior, however, through his clarity of thinking realistically assesses his capacities and his limitations in any given situation.”
Robert L. Moore, King, Warrior, Magician, Lover: Rediscovering the Archetypes of the Mature Masculine
Anthony Doerr
“Out in the forsaken city, every other structure, it seems, is burning or collapsing, but here in front of him is the inverse in miniature: the city remains, but the house he occupies is gone.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
“a warrior knows what he wants, and he knows how to get it. As a function of his clarity of mind he is a strategist and a tactician. He can evaluate his circumstances accurately and then adapt himself to the “situation on the ground,” as we say.”
Robert L. Moore, King, Warrior, Magician, Lover: Rediscovering the Archetypes of the Mature Masculine
Jonathan Auxier
“across the floorboards. Molly watched”
Jonathan Auxier, The Night Gardener
Anthony Doerr
“a little redheaded girl in a maroon cape emerges from a doorway, maybe six or seven years old, small for her age, with big clear eyes that remind him of Jutta’s. She runs across the street to the park and plays there alone, beneath the budding trees, while her mother stands on the corner and bites the tips of her fingers. The girl climbs into the swing and pendulums back and forth, pumping her legs, and watching her opens some valve in Werner’s soul. This is life, he thinks, this is why we live, to play like this on a day when winter is finally releasing its grip. He waits for Neumann Two to come around the truck and say something crass, to spoil it, but he doesn’t, and neither does Bernd, maybe they don’t see her at all, maybe this one pure thing will escape their defilement, and the girl sings as she swings, a high song that Werner recognizes, a counting song that girls jumping rope in the alley behind Children’s House used to sing, Eins, zwei, Polizei, drei, vier, Offizier, and how he would like to join her, push her higher and higher, sing fünf, sechs, alte Hex, sieben, acht, gute Nacht!”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Robert M. Sapolsky
“In other cases the challenge is to appreciate how, though human physiology resembles that of other species, we use the physiology in novel ways.”
Robert M. Sapolsky, Behave: The Biology of Humans at Our Best and Worst
Anthony Doerr
“Neumann One, who, if he were not scheduled to die ten weeks from now in the Allied invasion of Normandy, might have become a barber later in life, who would have smelled of talc and whiskey and put his index finger into men’s ears to position their heads, whose pants and shirts always would have been covered with clipped hairs, who, in his shop, would have taped postcards of the Alps around the circumference of a big cheap wavery mirror, who would have been faithful to his stout wife for the rest of his life—Neumann One says, “Time for haircuts.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
“How does the man accessing the Warrior know what aggressiveness is appropriate under the circumstances? He knows through clarity of thinking, through discernment. The warrior is always alert. He is always awake. He is never sleeping through life. He knows how to focus his mind and his body. He is what the samurai called “mindful.” He is a “hunter” in the Native American tradition.”
Robert L. Moore, King, Warrior, Magician, Lover: Rediscovering the Archetypes of the Mature Masculine
Erasmus
“«¿Habrá cosa más necia que el que un candidato servil halague al pueblo y compre su favor con propinas, soborne la adhesión de la masa, se deleite con sus aclamaciones, sea llevado en triunfo como una bandera venerable y se haga levantar una estatua de bronce en el foro? Agregad los nombres y sobrenombres que adoptan, los honores divinos otorgados a esos hombrecillos; agregad que tiranos criminales por demás sean comparados a los dioses en el curso de ceremonias públicas. Todas estas cosas no pueden ser más estultas y para reírse de ellas no bastaría con un solo Demócrito»”
Erasmus, Elogio de la Locura
Anthony Doerr
“It strikes Werner just then as wondrously futile to build splendid buildings, to make music, to sing songs, to print huge books full of colorful birds in the face of the seismic, engulfing indifference of the world—what pretensions humans have! Why bother to make music when the silence and wind are so much larger? Why light lamps when the darkness will inevitably snuff them? When Russian prisoners are chained by threes and fours to fences while German privates tuck live grenades in their pockets and run? Opera houses! Cities on the moon! Ridiculous. They would all do better to put their faces on the curbs and wait for the boys who come through the city dragging sledges stacked with corpses.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Haven Kimmel
“Cassie got in her truck.She didnt own much , but it was all there with her.A vintage Balabushka pool cue won fair & square; a backpackfrom a Boy Scout packed with Laura,s letters.a phone number in Biloxi.Her tools ,her boots ,her clothes,some books;she had a .22 pistol ,a Ruger Single-Six,strapped to her ankle.She had three hundred thousand in cash in a metal box behind her seat . She drove away .”
Haven Kimmel, Something Rising
“We lived so well here, yet neither he nor Mommy worked.”
Enjeela Ahmadi-Miller, The Broken Circle: A Memoir of Escaping Afghanistan
Anthony Doerr
“I thought they might take a break,” he says. Marie-Laure is thinking of her father. “Maybe,” she says, “it is even more important now?”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Anthony Doerr
“Upstairs Etienne broadcasts again and she thinks: I should station myself by the front door in case they come. I could buy him a few minutes. But it is too cold. Far better to stay in bed beneath the weight of the rug and dream herself back into the museum, trail her fingers along remembered walls, make her way across the echoing Grand Gallerytoward the key pound. All she has to do is cross the tiled floor and turn left and there Papa will be behind the counter, standing at his key cutter. He’ll say, What took you so long, bluebird? He’ll say, I will never leave you, not in a million years.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Friedrich Nietzsche
“This is simply the long history of the origin of responsibility. That task of breeding an animal which can make promises, includes, as we have already grasped, as its condition and preliminary, the more immediate task of first making man to a certain extent, necessitated, uniform, like among his like, regular, and consequently calculable. The immense work of what I have called, "morality of custom", the actual work of man on himself during the longest period of the human race, his whole prehistoric work, finds its meaning, its great justification (in spite of all its innate hardness, despotism, stupidity, and idiocy) in this fact: man, with the help of the morality of customs and of social strait-waistcoats, was made genuinely calculable. If, however, we place ourselves at the end of this colossal process, at the point where the tree finally matures its fruits, when society and its morality of custom finally bring to light that to which it was only the means, then do we find as the ripest fruit on its tree the sovereign individual, that resembles only himself, that has got loose from the morality of custom, the autonomous "super-moral" individual (for "autonomous" and "moral" are mutually-exclusive terms),—in short, the man of the personal, long, and independent will, competent to promise, and we find in him a proud consciousness (vibrating in every fibre), of what has been at last achieved and become vivified in him, a genuine consciousness of power and freedom, a feeling of human perfection in general. And this man who has grown to freedom, who is really competent to promise, this lord of the free will, this sovereign—how is it possible for him not to know how great is his superiority over everything incapable of binding itself by promises, or of being its own security, how great is the trust, the awe, the reverence that he awakes—he "deserves" all three—not to know that with this mastery over himself he is necessarily also given the mastery over circumstances, over nature, over all creatures with shorter wills, less reliable characters? The "free" man, the owner of a long unbreakable will, finds in this possession his standard of value: looking out from himself upon the others, he honours or he despises, and just as necessarily as he honours his peers, the strong and the reliable (those who can bind themselves by promises),—that is, every one who promises like a sovereign, with difficulty, rarely and slowly, who is sparing with his trusts but confers honour by the very fact of trusting, who gives his word as something that can be relied on, because he knows himself strong enough to keep it even in the teeth of disasters, even in the "teeth of fate,"—so with equal necessity will he have the heel of his foot ready for the lean and empty jackasses, who promise when they have no business to do so, and his rod of chastisement ready for the liar, who already breaks his word at the very minute when it is on his lips. The proud knowledge of the extraordinary privilege of responsibility, the consciousness of this rare freedom, of this power over himself and over fate, has sunk right down to his innermost depths, and has become an instinct, a dominating instinct—what name will he give to it, to this dominating instinct, if he needs to have a word for it? But there is no doubt about it—the sovereign man calls it his conscience.”
Friedrich Nietzsche, On the Genealogy of Morals
Anthony Doerr
“Everything has led to this: the death of his father; all those restless hours with Jutta listening to the crystal radio in the attic; Hans and Herribert wearing their red armbands under their shirts so Frau Elena would not see; four hundred dark, glittering nights at Schulpforta building transceivers for Dr. Hauptmann. The destruction of Frederick. Everything leading to this moment as Werner piles the haphazard Cossack equipment into the shell of the truck and sits with his back against the bench and watches the light from the burning cottage rise above the field. Bernd climbs in beside him, rifle in his lap, and neither bothers to close the back door when the Opel roars into gear.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
James Patterson
“Alonzo”
James Patterson, Ambush
Herman Melville
“Now, in general, Stick to the boat, is your true motto in whaling; but cases will sometimes happen when Leap from the boat, is still better.”
Herman Melville, Moby Dick
“hand (less than”
Barbara Seagram, 25 Bridge Conventions You Should Know - Part 1: Learn These First
Anthony Doerr
“Someone touches his shoulder. He has to brace himself against the sloping wall to avoid falling over. Marie-Laure stands behind him in her nightdress. The violins spiral down, then back up. Etienne takes Marie-Laure’s hand and together, beneath the low, sloping roof—the record spinning, the transmitter sending it over the ramparts, right through the bodies of the Germans and out to sea—they dance. He spins her; her fingers flicker through the air. In the candlelight, she looks of another world, her face all freckles, and in the center of the freckles those two eyes hang unmoving like the egg cases of spiders. They do not track him, but they do not unnerve him, either; they seem almost to see into a separate, deeper place, a world that consists only of music. Graceful. Lean. Coordinated as she whirls, though how she knows what dancing is, he could never guess. The song plays on. He lets it go too long. The antenna is still up, probably dimly visible against the sky; the whole attic might as well shine like a beacon. But in the candlelight, in the sweet rush of the concerto, Marie-Laure bites her lower lip, and her face gives off a secondary glow, reminding him of the marshes beyond the town walls, in those winter dusks when the sun has set but isn’t fully swallowed, and big patches of reeds catch red pools of light and burn—places he used to go with his brother, in what seems like lifetimes ago. This, he thinks, is what the numbers mean. The concerto ends. A wasp goes tap tap tap along the ceiling. The transmitter remains on, the microphone tucked into the bell of the electrophone as the needle traces the outermost groove. Marie-Laure breathes heavily, smiling.
After she has gone back to sleep, after Etienne has blown out his candle, he kneels for a long time beside his bed. The bony figure of Death rides the streets below, stopping his mount now and then to peer into windows. Horns of fire on his head and smoke leaking from his nostrils and, in his skeletal hand, a list newly charged with addresses. Gazing first at the crew of officers unloading from their limousines into the chateau.
Then at the glowing rooms of the perfumer Claude Levitte.
Then at the dark tall house of Etienne LeBlanc.
Pass us by, Horseman. Pass this house by.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Kate Mascarenhas
“Grace’s complaints reminded Ruby of her own feelings about university friends. People you’d once die for take appalling paths. It’s not that they become unrecognizable. They become more like themselves. Personality quirks grow more pronounced, and so do values, until you wonder how you ever ignored the differences between you.”
Kate Mascarenhas, The Psychology of Time Travel
“But then Mommy had always demanded the best things in life, and here in India she didn’t appear to lack for anything.”
Enjeela Ahmadi-Miller, The Broken Circle: A Memoir of Escaping Afghanistan
Abbi Jacobson
“Love revealed how covered up I was, but heartache broke me open.”
Abbi Jacobson, I Might Regret This: Essays, Drawings, Vulnerabilities, and Other Stuff
tags: love, truth
Anthony Doerr
“They go down the ladder and clamber out through the wardrobe. No soldiers wait in the hall with guns drawn. Nothing seems different at all. A line comes back to Marie-Laure from Jules Verne: Science, my lad, is made up of mistakes, but they are mistakes which it is useful to make, because they lead little by little to the truth. Etienne laughs as though to himself. “Do you remember what Madame said about the boiling frog?” “Yes, Uncle.” “I wonder, who was supposed to be the frog? Her? Or the Germans?”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Anthony Doerr
“Ready?” He sounds like her father when he was about to say something silly. In her memory, Marie-Laure hears the two policemen: People have been arrested for less. And Madame Manec: Don’t you want to be alive before you die? “Yes.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Jodi Picoult
“That if our legacy is not entitlement, it must be hope. Because if it’s not, then we become the shiftless, the wandering, the conquered. We become what they think we are. —”
Jodi Picoult, Small Great Things
Tui T. Sutherland
“echoed,”
Tui T. Sutherland, The Dark Secret
“Life wasn't meant to be lived hating others that is a concept we have created for our selves that must be disregarded.”
Shemar Stephens
Virginia Sole-Smith
“We have to get reacquainted with our own innate preferences. We must decide for ourselves what we like and dislike, and how different foods make us feel when we aren’t prejudging every bite we take. It takes its own kind of relentless vigilance to screen out all that noise. It requires accepting that the weight you most want to be may not be compatible with this kind of more intuitive eating—but that it’s nevertheless okay to be this size, to take up the space that your body requires.”
Virginia Sole-Smith, The Eating Instinct: Food Culture, Body Image, and Guilt in America
Anthony Doerr
“Marie-Laure taps on her door, waits a hundred heartbeats.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Melanie Charlene
“Take the time to observe the simple and ponder upon the seemingly insignificant. You’ll find a wealth of depth and beauty.”
Melanie Charlene
Anthony Doerr
“I’m not your mama,” hisses Werner. “Come on, now.” Frederick’s expression is entirely without artifice. Somewhere in the kitchen, the maid is listening. There is no other sound, not of traffic or airplanes or trains or radios or the specter of Frau Schwartzenberger rattling the cage of the elevator. No chanting no singing no silk banners no bands no trumpets no mother no father no slick-fingered commandant dragging a finger across his back. The city seems utterly still, as though everyone is listening, waiting for someone to slip.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Anthony Doerr
“Don’t you ever get tired of believing, Madame? Don’t you ever want proof?” Madame Manec rests a hand on Marie-Laure’s forehead. The thick hand that first reminded her of a gardener’s or a geologist’s. “You must never stop believing. That’s the most important thing.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Melanie Charlene
“We share such a beautiful world. If nothing else, may we always find commonality and conversation on that basis”
Melanie Charlene
Meg Wolitzer
“We can’t be afraid of change, or else we’ll miss out on everything.”
Meg Wolitzer, Belzhar
Pam Godwin
“A greedy throb tightens the front of my pants, but the reaction means fuckall. It’s simple, really. I want sex. Filthy, kinky sex. Nothing more.”
Pam Godwin, Dark Notes
Ed Cyzewski
“I can't learn or will myself into God's holiness, but my own willpower and planning can make all of the difference in whether I am present for God and his transformation.”
Ed Cyzewski, Flee, Be Silent, Pray: An Anxious Evangelical Finds Peace with God through Contemplative Prayer
Anthony Doerr
“The shell may be broken, and even portions of it removed, and yet after a certain lapse of time the injured parts will be repaired by a deposition of shelly matter at the fractured parts. “There’s hope for me yet!” says Etienne, and laughs, and Marie-Laure is reminded that her great-uncle was not always so fearful, that he had a life before this war and before the last one too; that he was once a young man who dwelled in the world and loved it as she does.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Virginia Sole-Smith
“To the psychologists, doctors, nutrition scientists, and advocates who champion the Health at Every Size approach, just as to the disciples of Satter’s Division of Responsibility, the answer seems simple: Eat the type and amount of food you want, when you want it. Recognize that all bodies are valuable and worthy of respect. Decide you can make choices for your health without making a moral judgment about your weight. View the goals of nutrition and a more sustainable food system as worthwhile, but not so all-encompassing that they should dictate how you behave at every meal.”
Virginia Sole-Smith, The Eating Instinct: Food Culture, Body Image, and Guilt in America
“Everything grows for everybody. Everything dies for everybody, too.”
Henry Mitchell, The Writer in the Garden
Anthony Doerr
“She thinks: They just say words, and what are words but sounds these men shape out of breath, weightless vapors they send into the air of the kitchen to dissipate and die.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Anthony Doerr
“I don’t want to make trouble, Madame.” “Isn’t doing nothing a kind of troublemaking?” “Doing nothing is doing nothing.” “Doing nothing is as good as collaborating.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
“Wherever humans garden magnificently, there are magnificent heartbreaks.... I never see a great garden, (even in my mind's eye, which is the best place to see great gardens around here), but I think of the calamities that have visited it, unsuspected by the delighted gardener who supposes, "It must be nice to garden there."
It is not nice to garden anywhere. Everywhere there are startling winds, once in every five centuries floods....
Now the gardener is the one who has seen everything ruined so many times that, even as his pain increases with each loss, he comprehends, truly knows, that where there was a garden once there can be again.”
Henry Mitchell, The Writer in the Garden
Melanie Charlene
“Children who grow what they eat will often eat what they grow”
Melanie Charlene
Anthony Doerr
“Entropy is the degree of randomness or disorder in a system, Doctor.” His eyes fix on Werner’s for a heartbeat, a glance both warm and chilling. “Disorder. You hear the commandant say it. You hear your bunk masters say it. There must be order. Life is chaos, gentlemen. And what we represent is an ordering to that chaos. Even down to the genes. We are ordering the evolution of the species. Winnowing out the inferior, the unruly, the chaff. This is the great project of the Reich, the greatest project human beings have ever embarked upon.” Hauptmann writes on the blackboard. The cadets inscribe the words into their composition books. The entropy of a closed system never decreases. Every process must by law decay.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Mehmet Murat ildan
“If you are too much interested in the story of others, then your own story will be orphaned!”
Mehmet Murat ildan
Anthony Doerr
“Frederick’s dreaminess, his otherness—it’s on him like a scent, and everyone can smell it.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Mehmet Murat ildan
“Başkalarının hikâyeleriyle çok fazla ilgileniyorsan, o zaman kendi hikâyen yetim kalacaktır!”
Mehmet Murat ildan
Anthony Doerr
“Does she grieve over his absence? Or has she calcified her feelings, protected herself, as he is learning to do?”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“En la repetición del atraso no hay oportunidad ninguna.”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición
Anthony Doerr
“I’ll fly us west, you and me, Frau Elena too if she wants. Or we could take a train. We’ll ride through forests and villages de montagnes, all those places Frau Elena talked about when we were small. Maybe we could ride all the way to Paris.” The burgeoning light. The tender hissing of the grass. Jutta opens her eyes but doesn’t look at him. “Don’t tell lies. Lie to yourself, Werner, but don’t lie to me.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Melanie Charlene
“Nature is a tonic that can neither be packaged nor bottled... It eases the mind and soothes the senses.”
Melanie Charlene
Anthony Doerr
“You know what I used to listen to? On our radio? Before you ruined it?” “Hush, Jutta. Please.” “Broadcasts from Paris. They’d say the opposite of everything Deutschlandsender says. They’d say we were devils. That we were committing atrocities. Do you know what atrocities means?"
"Please Jutta."
“Is it right,” Jutta says, “to do something only because everyone else is doing it?” Doubts: slipping in like eels. Werner shoves them back. Jutta is barely twelve years old, still a child.”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Anthony Doerr
“Everybody has misplaced someone,”
Anthony Doerr, All the Light We Cannot See
Virginia Sole-Smith
“So it’s our discomfort—and even disgust—with the joy of eating that frightens us. And that’s because of a culture that tells us, in a thousand ways, from the time we first start solid foods, that this comfort cannot be trusted. That we cannot be trusted to know what and how much to eat. We must outsource this judgment to experts who know better—first to our parents; then to teachers; then to food gurus and big brands, who sell us on diets, cleanses, food dogmas, and “lifestyle changes.” We cede our knowledge, our own personal relationship with food, to an entire world built on the premise that we don’t know how to feed ourselves.”
Virginia Sole-Smith, The Eating Instinct: Food Culture, Body Image, and Guilt in America
Pam Godwin
“Sweet merciful fuck, words like shockingly pretty dilute the effect of his image. Yeah, the first glimpse is a shock, but it’s not just his attractiveness. It’s his presence, his projection of self-assurance and command that makes me feel disoriented, breathless, and really fucking weird deep in my core.”
Pam Godwin, Dark Notes
Virginia Sole-Smith
“I also hear an apology almost every time I witness a female friend eating cheese. Or bread. Or chocolate. We feel especially compelled to apologize for enjoying food, for wanting seconds, for appearing to eat even a single bite more than we think we should.”
Virginia Sole-Smith, The Eating Instinct: Food Culture, Body Image, and Guilt in America
John Lewis Gaddis
“If that’s the case, though, why did the Union, under Lincoln, so catastrophically fail? The easy answer might be that no strategy anticipates all contingencies, that every solution creates new problems, and that these can, at times, overwhelm. The harsher one—although I think the more accurate one—lies in the possibility that the Founders left the Union to test itself: knowing the need to proportion aspirations to capabilities, recognizing the incompatibilities in good things, they chose to save their new state, and leave to their descendants the saving of its soul. Augustine and Machiavelli had both seen in proportionality a way to balance the respective claims of souls and states: their differences lay in whether equilibria reached required accountability to God. Augustine said yes and labored mightily to provide it. Machiavelli’s God left statecraft to man. Americans, in varieties almost as infinite as those of Elizabeth I, straddled this divide: they could be, like their early leaders, coolly pragmatic, like their revivalists fiercely religious, and like their entrepreneurs anywhere in between. What’s clear, though, is that few in the young republic questioned—at least not openly—what so many in the mature republic would give their lives to change: the anomaly that a Constitution promising a “more perfect Union” assumed slavery’s legality. 69”
John Lewis Gaddis, On Grand Strategy
Virginia Sole-Smith
“Apologizing around food—for our failure to make it good enough, healthy enough, for what we’re choosing to eat, for what we’re daring to serve others—has become an important ritual in today’s food culture.”
Virginia Sole-Smith, The Eating Instinct: Food Culture, Body Image, and Guilt in America
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“Crear un país de leyes significa arrancar esa costumbre de un sector todavía amplio de la sociedad mexicana.”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición
Melanie Charlene
“Sometimes, the most productive thing that you can do is to step outside and do nothing... relax and enjoy nature.”
Melanie Charlene
Todd Rose
“the purpose of schools was not to educate all students to the same level, but to sort them,”
Todd Rose, The End of Average: How We Succeed in a World That Values Sameness
Fredrik Backman
“He sits in silence with his hands gripping the edge of the bench. She does the same, because she likes holding it while he's also holding it. She peers at him and wants to say that it's not his fault. That she's just too old to fall in love. She wants to tell him that he can find himself someone better. That he deserves something perfect. But she doesn't say anything, because she's afraid he'll say she is perfect.”
Fredrik Backman
tags: love
John Lewis Gaddis
“The American republic now extended across a third of a continent, and was unlikely to stop there. How then could the British time bomb of generosity—the ocean of land ceded in 1783—fail to revive familiar protests of “no taxation without representation”? Where, if that happened, would Hamilton’s “UNION” be? Madison solved these issues of time and space by shifting scale. In doing so he drew, knowingly or not, 65 on Machiavelli. For only in republics, the Florentine had observed, could the “common good” be “looked to properly.” By expanding the number who benefited, the influence of the few who didn’t could be reduced: not all parts, submerged in wholes, need drown. 66 Scale could be the life preserver. There were, Madison acknowledged, dangers in this: By enlarging too much the number of electors [voters], you render the representative too little acquainted with all their local circumstances and lesser interests; as by reducing it too much, you render him unduly attached to these, and too little fit to comprehend and pursue great and national objects. But surely there existed “a mean, on both sides of which inconveniences will be found to lie.” In this way balancing factions—a Burkean enterprise—could put “inconveniences” to good use: Extend the sphere, and you take in a greater variety of parties and interests; you make it less probable that a majority of the whole will have a common motive to invade the rights of other citizens; or if such a common motive exists, it will be more difficult for all who feel it to discover their own strength, and to act in unison with each other. The proposed Constitution “forms a happy combination in this respect; the great and aggregate interests being referred to the national, the local and particular to the State legislatures.” 67”
John Lewis Gaddis, On Grand Strategy
Fredrik Backman
“He sits in silence with his hands gripping the edge of the bench. She does the same, because she likes holding it while he's also holding it. She peers at him and wants to say that it's not his fault. That she's just too old to fall in love. She wants to tell him that he can find himself someone better. That he deserves something perfect. But she doesn't say anything, because she's afraid he'll say he is perfect.”
Fredrik Backman, Britt-Marie Was Here
tags: love
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“El gobierno estableció una idea de lo público donde nada cuesta y nadie rinde cuentas, donde las finanzas del gobierno son un bien de todos que viene de ninguna parte, y nadie tiene que cuidarlo, y todos pueden meterle mano cuando les toca.”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición
Evie Gaughan
“In my chest, a strange voice awakens and a song plays inside me a longing that is not mine. They say that ancestors, dead before their time, with young blood still in their veins, with great passion in their blood, with the sun still burning in their blood come, come to continue to live within us their unfinished lives. O, who knows, soul of mine, in which chest you will sing… ‘Silence’ by Lucian Blaga”
Evie Gaughan, The Heirloom
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“La ciudadanía mexicana quiere un Estado que cumpla con una enorme cantidad de compromisos públicos, pero no está dispuesta a pagar en impuestos lo que espera que su gobierno le devuelva en servicios. Tiene suspendido el vínculo fundamental que hay entre pagar impuestos y exigir cuentas al gobierno. Exige pero no paga y paga sin exigir.”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición
Virginia Sole-Smith
“look in the kitchen cupboards of most American households and you are likely to find odd combinations of ingredients or bulk snack-food stashes that have little to do with nutrition and everything to do with childhood, memory, habit.”
Virginia Sole-Smith, The Eating Instinct: Food Culture, Body Image, and Guilt in America
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“Las leyes incumplibles, compendios éticos de sueños nacionales, tienen un efecto invisible profundamente corruptor sobre la cultura cívica”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición
“Time is one-way ticket.”
Khalid Masood
John Lewis Gaddis
“Which somehow made it appropriate that The Federalist’s hardest task—showing how a republic could be an empire without becoming a tyranny—fell to Madison, the most easily underestimated of the American Founders. 63 He fulfilled it, triumphantly, by connecting time, space, and scale. History had shown “instability, injustice, and confusion” always to have extinguished “popular governments,” Madison wrote in the tenth Publius essay. Independence had yet to free Americans from these dangers. Complaints are everywhere heard . . . that the public good is disregarded in the conflicts of rival parties, and that measures are too often decided, not according to the rules of justice and the rights of the minor party, but by the superior force of an interested and overbearing majority. Revoking liberty would be a remedy “worse than the disease.” But curing it through equality would leave no one safe: [D] emocracies have ever been spectacles of turbulence and contention; have ever been found incompatible with personal security or the rights of property; and have in general been as short in their lives as they have been violent in their deaths.”
John Lewis Gaddis, On Grand Strategy
Meg Wolitzer
“Everyone has something to say. But not everyone can bear to say it. Your job is to find a way.”
Meg Wolitzer, Belzhar
John Lewis Gaddis
“The subject speaks its own importance,” Hamilton announced in the first essay’s first paragraph, “comprehending in its consequences nothing less than the existence of the UNION, the safety and welfare of the parts of which it is composed, the fate of an empire in many respects the most interesting in the world.” For it seems to have been reserved to the people of this country, by their conduct and example, to decide the important question, whether societies of men are really capable or not of establishing good government from reflection and choice, or whether they are forever destined to depend for their political constitutions on accident and force.”
John Lewis Gaddis, On Grand Strategy
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“Pero ¿quién decide si las leyes son justas? Nadie, cada quien. Millones de mexicanos se erigen todos los días en jueces de cuáles leyes deben o no obedecer.”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición
“Educational injustice enabled people to preserve their illusions, inequality of opportunity fostered the myth of human equality.”
Michael Young, The Rise of the Meritocracy
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“Un gobierno dispuesto a aplicar estrictamente las leyes, tendría que perseguir a una cantidad imposible de mexicanos. Tendría casi que declararle la guerra a su sociedad.”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición
Robert Kurson
“—  If an undertaking was easy, someone else already would have done it. —  If you follow in another’s footsteps, you miss the problems really worth solving. —  Excellence is born of preparation, dedication, focus, and tenacity; compromise on any of these and you become average. —  Every so often, life presents a great moment of decision, an intersection at which a man must decide to stop or go; a person lives with these decisions forever. —  Examine everything; not all is as it seems or as people tell you. —  It is easiest to live with a decision if it is based on an earnest sense of right and wrong. —  The guy who gets killed is often the guy who got nervous. The guy who doesn’t care anymore, who has said, “I’m already dead—the fact that I live or die is irrelevant and the only thing that matters is the accounting I give of myself,” is the most formidable force in the world. —  The worst possible decision is to give up. For four months, Chatterton thought about the right way and the wrong way to live, and he continued to contemplate his principles. As”
Robert Kurson, Shadow Divers: The True Adventure of Two Americans Who Risked Everything to Solve One of the Last Mysteries of World War II
Kelly  Jensen
“Maybe my “meddling” words did little to change the teacher’s private view, but at least I identified myself as an advocate for the student.”
Kelly Jensen, Here We Are: Feminism for the Real World
Virginia Sole-Smith
“Our eating instincts are disrupted by modern diet culture, in which food is supposed to be fuel, not therapy. Just as the PICU doctors and dietitians think of nutrition as a prescription they can write and then tweak for optimal results, we’re taught that a “healthy” relationship with food means that you only ever eat for sustenance. Enjoyment is allowed only when you’re eating certain kinds of foods blessed with the right kind of packaging, or better yet, no packaging at all. Otherwise, we’re supposed to ignore the sheer existence of food unless we’re hungry, and then eat only what we need to feel full, but never a bite more. You shouldn’t eat to combat depression, or stress, or just because something tastes good, if you are not also physically hungry. And yet—the physical sensation of hunger is emotional. Hunger triggers a huge range of feelings, depending on its severity—excitement, irritability, weepiness, confusion. And eating brings more: pleasure, contentment, satisfaction, bliss. We cannot separate these things. I’m not sure that we should try.”
Virginia Sole-Smith, The Eating Instinct: Food Culture, Body Image, and Guilt in America
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“Lo cierto es que la primera nueva costumbre que el país adquirió fue la de negociar el incumplimiento de sus leyes.”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición
Pam Jenoff
“The truth is sometimes the very opposite from what you expect it to be.”
Pam Jenoff, The Lost Girls of Paris
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“Crear un “país de leyes” —un país donde se cumplan las leyes— es el más viejo propósito de los gobiernos de México. Es también el fracaso político más repetido de nuestra historia.”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición
Yuval Noah Harari
“Los antiguos romanos estaban acostumbrados a ser derrotados. Al igual que los mandatarios de la mayor parte de los grandes imperios de la historia, podían perder batalla tras batalla pero aun así ganar la guerra.”
Yuval Noah Harari, Sapiens. De animales a dioses: Una breve historia de la humanidad
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“México parece listo para dar el paso, pero no lo está realmente. No está dispuesto, ni en el gobierno ni en la sociedad, a someterse a lo único que puede arbitrar una pluralidad democrática efectiva: el respeto colectivo a la ley.”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición
Paul Kalanithi
“I expected to feel only empty and heartbroken after Paul died. It never occurred to me that you could love someone the same way after he was gone, that I would continue to feel such love and gratitude alongside the terrible sorrow, the grief so heavy that at times I shiver and moan under the weight of it. Paul is gone, and I miss him acutely nearly every moment, but I somehow feel I’m still taking part in the life we created together. “Bereavement is not the truncation of married love,” C. S. Lewis wrote, “but one of its regular phases—like the honeymoon. What we want is to live our marriage well and faithfully through that phase too.” Caring for our daughter, nurturing relationships with family, publishing this book, pursuing meaningful work, visiting Paul’s grave, grieving and honoring him, persisting…my love goes on—lives on—in a way I’d never expected. - Lucy Kalanithi”
Paul Kalanithi, When Breath Becomes Air
Paul Kalanithi
“The Servant Song” while standing side by side in a church pew, and the words vibrated with meaning as we faced uncertainty and pain together: “I will share your joy and sorrow / Till we’ve seen this journey through.” - Lucy Kalanithi”
Paul Kalanithi, When Breath Becomes Air
Paul Kalanithi
“Always the seer is a sayer,” Emerson wrote. “Somehow his dream is told; somehow he publishes it with solemn joy.” Writing this book was a chance for this courageous seer to be a sayer, to teach us to face death with integrity. - Lucy Kalanithi”
Paul Kalanithi, When Breath Becomes Air
Paul Kalanithi
“then we all took time turns weeping, studying Paul’s face and each other’s with concern, steeped in the preciousness and pain of this time, our last hours all together. - Lucy Kalanithi”
Paul Kalanithi, When Breath Becomes Air
Héctor Aguilar Camín
“A todo eso se le llama entonces “cambio estructural”. Le llamarían neoliberalismo después.”
Héctor Aguilar Camín, Nocturno de la democracia mexicana: Ensayos de la transición

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